SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING
MAINE'S COLLECTING INSTITUTIONS

Events at Member Institutions

Umbrella Cover Museum, Peaks Island Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Curran Homestead and Living History Museum, Orrington Hamilton House, South Berwick Union Historical Society 

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  • 05 Oct 2016 11:25 AM | Anonymous member

    The Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine [HHRC] in partnership with the Kennebec Valley Art Association [KVAA] present Equal Protection of the Laws, an exhibition featuring the work of 17 Maine artists inspired by the rights granted by the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

    The exhibition is the result of a call to artists to respond to the important themes of the 14th Amendment including: due process, liberty, gender and sexuality, race, legal protections, equality in the workplace, housing, education, law enforcement, rights of the incarcerated, tolerance, and local, state, and federal representation.

    Equal Protection of the Laws: America's Fourteenth Amendment, featuring 36 original works, runs through Friday, December 16th at the Michael Klahr Center on the campus of the University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive, Augusta, Maine 04330. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., or by appointment. Admission into the Klahr Center is free and it is open to the public.

    This exhibit has been made possible with funds from the Maine Humanities Council, the HHRC, and the University of Maine at Augusta. In addition, the project has received support from the KVAA, the Maine Arts Commission, and several individuals.

  • 04 Oct 2016 9:55 AM | Anonymous member

    In this talk, maritime historian Lincoln Paine will use the history of the Kennebec River as a lens through which to examine Maine and American history since the pre-Columbian period. Examining the different ways that people have approached the Kennebec over time provides us with a new way of reading and understanding the history of the United States and its people. Abenaki culture was deeply informed by the way that people related to the Kennebec, which also helped shape patterns of exploration and settlement by early European settlers and the subsequent commercial and industrial development of the late colonial and post-independence period.  While the Kennebec has often been viewed in terms of its importance to navigation—both for shuttling goods and people between the hinterland and the sea, as well as for shipbuilding—it has also been a source of industrial power, a conveyor belt for the lumber industry, a source of harvested ice, and latterly a showcase for environmental restoration.  In this respect, the many uses of the Kennebec offer a periodization of history that affords us a more nuanced appreciation of how Maine and the United States developed. 

     

    Lincoln Paine is a maritime historian, author, editor, and curator whose books include the award-winning The Sea and Civilization: A Maritime History of the World (2013), Down East: A Maritime History of Maine (2000), and Ships of the World: An Historical Encyclopedia (1997).  He is also an editor of Itinerario: International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction.  In 2012, he curated “Triumph of the Passenger Ship: Highlights from the Norman H. Morse Ocean Liner Collection, 1870–2010,” at the Osher Map Library and Smith Center for Cartographic Research, University of Southern Maine, in Portland.  He has lectured on a wide range of maritime and naval topics in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia.  A graduate of Columbia College, he spent fourteen years as a non-fiction and reference book editor and currently specializes in editing academic writing by non-native speakers of English.  He is a trustee of the Maine Maritime Museum. He and his wife, Allison, live in Portland and have two grown daughters.

    The Kennebec Historical Society October Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, October 19, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Augusta City Center, located at 16 Cony Street in Augusta.​  


  • 08 Sep 2016 2:55 PM | Anonymous member

    The story of Maine’s Historic Bridges is more faceted than you might think.  Why are bridges located where they are?  Who built them?  Why do they look the way they do?  Amanda Taylor, Architectural Historian, will provide a presentation based on the publication Historic Bridges of Maine: 350 Years of Bridge and Roadway Design.  She will discuss the unique ways in which Maine’s bridge builders overcame geography and environmental influences to provide travel throughout the state.  The talk also showcases several specific historic bridges in Maine and detail how their builders chose creative solutions to difficult crossings and how technology changed design and construction.

    Our speaker, Amanda Taylor, is an Architectural Historian for Kleinfelder, an international engineering and architecture firm with an office in Augusta.  In recent years, she has documented historic resources related to the Sarah Mildred Long Bridge in Kittery, Masse Saw and Grist Mill in Vassalboro, and Belfast and Moosehead Lake Railroad Freight House in Belfast.  She has spent much of the last four years completing historic resource surveys throughout Maine.

    The Kennebec Historical Society Annual Meeting Program is open to the public and will take place on Wednesday, September 28, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Viles Arboretum, located at 153 Hospital Street in Augusta.​  The public program will be preceded at 5pm by a potluck supper and at 6pm by the society’s annual business meeting.  Any members that wish to attend the potluck supper are invited to bring a dish to share.  Please note that the Annual Meeting program is not the society’s monthly program.


  • 30 Aug 2016 11:10 AM | Anonymous member

    Cynthia Milliken Taylor will be speaking on the historic aspects of the Cony Flatiron Building, which was rededicated on July 28, 2015, the restoration efforts and the adaptive re-use for Senior living.  Cynthia has an Architectural Degree from the Rhode Island School of Design and 30 years of experience in redeveloping old and new buildings for Seniors in Maine and New Hampshire.  With an interest in improving the lives of many older people and an eye for quality design she has developed over 3500 apartments and completed the financing and renovations of numerous historic buildings including the Inn at City Hall and the Cony Flatiron in Augusta.  Taking a leadership role in creative financing, construction and community building, she has tried to benefit those who live within and those who value their neighborhoods and cities through economic development.  Please join us at Cony Flatiron for an historic presentation on the Old and the New Cony High School.

    The Kennebec Historical Society September Public Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, September 21, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Cony Flatiron Building, located at 110 Cony Street in Augusta.​  Please note this is our monthly program and is separate from the program which will be held at the KHS Annual Meeting.


  • 19 Aug 2016 8:30 AM | Anonymous member

    Between 1944 and 1946, more than 4,000 German prisoners of war called Maine home. The story of how they arrived, and the lasting impact that they had on the people who encountered them is one of Maine’s most interesting and obscure stories.  Using materials and research used to create the 2012 exhibit “Maine Boys Overseas and German Boys in Maine,” Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine Program Director David Greenham shares the lively and surprising story of an interesting chapter of Maine history.  It is a story of cooperation, kindness, and enemies who became colleagues, and even friends. 

    David Greenham is an adjunct professor of Drama at the University of Maine at Augusta, works as a grant writer and Program Manager for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC).  He spent 14 years as the Producing Artistic Director of The Theater At Monmouth, and has been a theater artist and arts administrator for more than 25 years.  In 2013, David was the creator and performer of Maine at Work, a touring program commissioned by the Maine Humanities Council. He has also been seen as a performer with Everyman Repertory Theater, Bath Shakespeare Festival, Camden Shakespeare Festival, and Capitol City Improv in Augusta.  In 2013, David created the exhibit Maine Boys Overseas, and German Boys in Maine for the HHRC.  The exhibit and the research to create it was the inspiration for the POW Camps in Maine program that has been presented for several community groups in Maine.  He continues to research the project with the goal of writing a book about the topic in partnership with several historians.

    The Kennebec Historical Society and the Maine State Library’s Public Presentation will take place on Wednesday, August 24, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Maine State Library, 230 State Street in Augusta.  This is an encore presentation of the Kennebec Historical Society’s July Public Presentation and refreshments will be served.


  • 15 Aug 2016 9:04 AM | Anonymous member

    Florence Brooks Whitehouse was a Maine suffrage leader from 1914 – 1920. Her support of “radical” tactics, such as picketing President Wilson, earned condemnation from her more conservative suffrage peers in Maine.  As a result, she was left out of suffrage histories, although the record plainly shows that she did more than almost anyone in the closing years of the campaign to bring woman suffrage to the state. Through a statewide suffrage referendum, WWI, the 1918 influenza pandemic, and the political machinations of men of both major political parties, Florence and her peers fought for women’s right to vote and to have equality of opportunity with men. This is a story that has really never been told in Maine.

    Anne Gass, our August speaker and great-grand-daughter of Whitehouse, has written Voting Down the Rose: Florence Brooks Whitehouse and Maine’s Fight for Woman Suffrage, which is a lively account of Florence’s suffrage activities during the critical final years of the campaign.  Due to the wealth of correspondence, interviews, and other historical documents Gass found in her research, Florence is often able to speak for herself in the pages.  William Barry, who reviewed the book for the Portland Press Herald, wrote “The author, Whitehouse’s great-grand-daughter, is never sentimental, for this is a true work of scholarship. Gass depicts not only the work of one Maine suffragist, but also the clash between the Maine Woman Suffrage Association, founded in 1874, and the radical National Woman’s Party of 1916.”


    The Kennebec Historical Society August Presentation is free to the public (donations gladly accepted) and will take place on Wednesday, August 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Augusta City Center, located at 16 Cony Street in Augusta.​  


  • 20 Jul 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    The Kennebec Historical Society’s July Public Presentation:  “Maine’s German POW Camps in World War II”

    Between 1944 and 1946, more than 4,000 German prisoners of war called Maine home. The story of how they arrived, and the lasting impact that they had on the people who encountered them is one of Maine’s most interesting and obscure stories.  Using materials and research used to create the 2012 exhibit “Maine Boys Overseas and German Boys in Maine,” Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine Program Director David Greenham shares the lively and surprising story of an interesting chapter of Maine history.  It is a story of cooperation, kindness, and enemies who became colleagues, and even friends. 

    David Greenham is an adjunct professor of Drama at the University of Maine at Augusta, works as a grant writer and Program Manager for the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine (HHRC).  He spent 14 years as the Producing Artistic Director of The Theater At Monmouth, and has been a theater artist and arts administrator for more than 25 years.  In 2013, David was the creator and performer of Maine at Work, a touring program commissioned by the Maine Humanities Council. He has also been seen as a performer with Everyman Repertory Theater, Bath Shakespeare Festival, Camden Shakespeare Festival, and Capitol City Improv in Augusta.  In 2013, David created the exhibit Maine Boys Overseas, and German Boys in Maine for the HHRC.  The exhibit and the research to create it was the inspiration for the POW Camps in Maine program that has been presented for several community groups in Maine.  He continues to research the project with the goal of writing a book about the topic in partnership with several historians.

    The Kennebec Historical Society July Public Presentation will take place on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. at the Michael Klahr Center at the University of Maine at Augusta, 46 University Drive in Augusta.

  • 29 Jun 2016 7:00 PM | Anonymous member

    The L.C.Bates Museum has a blue marlin caught by Ernest Hemingway and mounted by Maine taxidermist Fred C. Parke of Bangor. Scholar Susan Beegel will present a talk on Wednesday, June 29 about the marlin and its history and marine life in Hemingway's work Old Man and the Sea. The talk is free and prior to the talk you may visit the museum to see the recently preserved marlin. 

    The L.C.Bates Museum is located at 14 Easler Road (on route 201) in Hinckley, ME. For more information contact the museum at 207-238-4250 or at lcbates@gwh.org.

  • 28 Jun 2016 6:30 PM | Anonymous member

    The Tate House Museum presents Poetry in the Garden on the Tate House lawn by the Stroudwater River on Tuesday, June 28 from 6:30 - 8:00 PM.

    Seeing with the Heart's Ear is a presentation of poems from Martin Steingesser's new book, Yellow Horses, and a garden of poems by several other poets presented as an ensemble work in two voices by Martin, Portland’s first Poet Laureate, and performer Judy Tierney.

    Martin Steingesser's poems whisper, shout and occasionally slam. He is author of three books of poems, Yellow Horses; Brothers of Morning; and The Thinking Heart: the Life & Loves of Etty Hillesum, based on Hillesum’s writings, composed and arranged for performance. The Thinking Heart has toured in New England and in Europe, at the International Etty Hillesum Congress (2014). “His poems are ablaze with imagination,” said poet Laure-Anne Bosselaar. “A burning, tender voice,” declared former Maine Poet Laureate Baron Wormser.

    Judy Tierney is a performer and member of The Thinking Heart Ensemble that toured New England and Europe, a former radio show host, dancer and Taiji practitioner.

    This promises to be an unforgettable evening as Martin and Judy captivate the audience by bringing words to life with their engaging presentation.

    This event is part of the Tate House Museum Summer Lecture Series. The admission fee, which supports the museum and its programs, is $10 ($8 for museum members). Light refreshments will be served. For reservations please call 774-6177 or e-mail the museum at info@tatehouse.org.


  • 25 Jun 2016 11:00 AM | Anonymous member

    A Strawberry Festival and Craft Fair will be held on Saturday, June 25, 2016, at the Washburn-Norlands Living History Center, in Livermore, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.  The Festival features a craft fair with artisans demonstrating handmade craft and selling original artwork.  Admission to the craft fair is free.  Regular admission applies to all other activities. There are activities for all ages and all buildings will be open for tours. Ongoing activities for the day include horse-drawn hayrides, tours of the 1867 Washburn family mansion, blacksmithing demonstrations, lessons of the past and spelling bees in the one-room schoolhouse, artifact games and living history in the farmer’s cottage, special presentations, storytelling, and old-fashioned outdoor games such as hoops & graces and croquet. Children’s craft activities include making kites, bean bags, and handkerchief dolls.  Strawberry Shortcake for sale, made with homemade biscuits, local strawberries, and real whipped cream.

    For an enchanted experience and to get inspired about life in 19th-century Maine and Livermore’s celebrated Washburn Family – visit the Norlands – where history comes to life!   

    General admission is $10; $6 ages 12 and under; $25 family rate. FMI: 207-897-4366 or norlands@norlands.org.

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